iPads in the Music Classroom Professional Development Workshop

This month I presented my first PD workshop titled ‘iPads in the Middle Primary Music Classroom’  at the Music Technology in Education Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

I had really great feedback from the participants and comments that the information I shared is not only relevant to Middle Primary but all the way through K-12.

garageBand

imoviepagesdropbox_229x128inigma qr code readerAirDisplay_MacClient_iconreflectordoceri

 

The topics and apps I presented on were:

  1. Remotely controlling your computer with your iPad using Doceri or Air Display
  2. Displaying your iPad screen via Airplay using Reflector or Apple TV
  3. Using Dropbox in the classroom (click link to see notes)
  4. Using QR codes in the classroom (click link to see notes)
  5. Using Pages as a tool for your teaching
  6. Creating Interactive Posters
  7. Book Creator for projects and digital portfolios
  8. Music Room Tech: Signature Ringtones, my upcoming publication, an 8 week unit of work using iPad apps to create a personalised ringtone.

I hope to do more presentations around Australia in the next 12 months.

While I am a Specialist Classroom Music teacher, I am also trained and have taught  JP/P generalist classroom, so can modify the above topics for general classroom use.

If you are interested in booking me please email cheryl@bushfirepress.com

DSC_2173_round

 

Teach to transform!

Cheryl

iPads and Dropbox in the classroom

This month I presented my first ever Professional Development workshop at the Music Technology in Education Conference in Melbourne, Australia, on using iPad’s in the music classroom.

I had really great feedback from the participants and hope to do more presentations around Australia in the next 12 months.

dropbox_229x128iPad’s and Dropbox

Part of my presentation was on using Dropbox to provide files and information to students and to gather work samples from them.

Where I teach, students don’t have individual email addresses so to ask them to email me files for assessment is impossible. I also have the problem that not all iPad’s in the classroom are airdrop compatible so that option to collect work is also eliminated.

I came up with the idea of creating a class dropbox account that students can log in to (and out of) on their iPad.

The iPad app allows you to log in and out of  different dropbox accounts, so if you have a personal one it is quite simple to log out of that and then into the class one to upload or download content.

This has worked extremely well for me and my students as it allows me to

  1.  access their work samples to assess at home
  2. upload files for them to download to their iPad

Below is a set of instructions on 3 different ways you can set up Dropbox to work in your classroom.

Alternately download a pdf of these instructions here dropbox_instructions_10_2014.

Description: Dropbox is a way you can share files between devices and computers. Upload templates, music tracks, videos and photos for students to open in apps on their iPad. You can open Dropbox accounts in the internet browser on your computer to upload files from your computer, or on your iPad, directly from any apps that allow files to be opened in Dropbox.

3 Different Classroom Uses:

  1. Have a class Dropbox account that everyone logs in and out of.

 

  1. Download the free Dropbox app onto all student iPad’s
  2. Create a dropbox account with a class school email address or create a free account such as yahoo
  3. Go to the class email inbox and verify the account
  4. Open Dropbox app and Login to the account you created.
  5. Go back into the app you were working in select your file/project, select ‘Open in’, in the app options select Dropbox. This will take you to Dropbox
  6. Select ‘Choose a different folder’
  7. Select the specified folder
  8. Select choose (down the bottom)
  9. Select Save.
  10. Wait for document to upload
  11. If you don’t want the students to have access everyday to this account ask them to log out before leaving the classroom and change the password.

 

  1. Each student has an individual account and shares the download link via email to you.

 

  1. Download the free Dropbox app onto all student iPad’s
  2. Each student creates a dropbox account with an individual email address
  3. Go to their email inbox and verify the account
  4. Go back into the app you were working in select your file/project, select ‘Open in’, in the app options select Dropbox. This will take you to Dropbox
  5. Select ‘Choose a different folder’
  6. Select the specified folder
  7. Select choose (down the bottom)
  8. Select Save
  9. Wait for document to upload
  10. Select uploaded document (wait for the preview to come up in the window)
  11. Select the export button above the preview window
  12. Select mail and email link to teacher

 

 

 

  1. Each student has an individual account and has shared folders with you.

 

  1. Download the free Dropbox app onto all student iPad’s
  2. Create a dropbox account with an individual email address
  3. Go to their email inbox and verify the account
  4. To create shared folders, on student iPad,
  • select the 3 dots
  • select create folder
  • name your folder (ie students name & subject)
  • select export (which is next to the 3 dots)
  • ‘invite people to folder’
  • type email address of dropbox account you want them to share to
  • select invite
  • Teacher logs into their account on the internet, not in the app (the app doesn’t yet allow you to accept invitations within the app)
  • Select the ‘sharing’ tab down the side, it will have a number in a red box showing how many invites you have to accept
  • Select the ‘folder invitation’
  • Select ‘Accept’ the folder will now appear both on the internet and in your app.
  1. To save a file from the iPad to Dropbox, ensure you are logged into the Dropbox app.
  2. Go back into the app you were working in select your file/project, select ‘Open in’, in the app options select Dropbox. This will take you to Dropbox
  3. Select ‘Choose a different folder’
  4. Select the shared folder
  5. Select choose (down the bottom)
  6. Select Save
  7. Wait for document to upload then it will be accessible on the teacher’s dropbox.

To invite students to a folder you have created just follow the above steps and ask the students to log into their Dropbox account online to accept the invitation.

How to open the student files on your iPad

  1. If it was emailed select the link in the email to open it, follow the instructions in Safari. Tap the top of the page to ‘Open in’.
  2. If saved to Dropbox, open the app on your iPad, and either open the shared folder or log in to the class account
  3. Select the uploaded document
  4. Select the export button (above the preview window)
  5. Select ‘Open in’
  6. Choose the app you wish to open it in

DSC_2173_round

 

Teach to transform!

Cheryl

iPads and QR Codes in the Classroom

This month I presented my first Professional Development workshop at the Music Technology in Education Conference in Melbourne, Australia, on using iPad’s in the music classroom.

I had really great feedback from the participants and hope to do more presentations around Australia in the next 12 months.


iPad’s and QR Codesqrcode.16232767

Part of my presentation was on using QR codes to provide files and information to students or an audience.

Have you ever been frustrated when writing a website address on the whiteboard and it takes over 10 minutes for all students to correctly type it in?! The answer to this problem is a tablet device with a QR code reader app such as i-nigma.

I had seen these little, funny looking, square barcodes on cereal boxes, milk containers and in magazines but I had never realised I could use them in the classroom as an extremely quick way for students to access a website (or 20+ other things the bar codes can deliver to you).

 

All the students have to do isinigma qr code reader

  1. download a QR reader, i-nigma is a fantastic free app on both i-Tunes & Google Play
  2. scan the QR code you have created on a free QR creator website, there are many but I really like  www.qrstuff.com
  3. The app will direct them to go online, or to wherever your QR code takes them

 

screentake 1  screentake 2  screentake 3  screentake 4

pacific harmonies qr posterI download the QR code I create, then display it on a poster in my classroom see my example to the right:

This poster is a link to the Bushfire Press additional support material for the Pacific Harmonies module in Music Room: A developmental classroom music program Book 6 you may download a PDF of this here: pacific harmonies qr poster

There are so many ways you can use QR codes, directing students to websites is only 1 of them. You can create QR codes and place them around the classroom for

  • quick access to websites (no typing of url needed!)
  • dropbox links
  • answers to questions (in text format not on a website)
  • google map location
  • app store download
  • iTunes link
  • create a scavenger hunt

Download my instructions for using QR codes in the classroom here: QR_code_instructions_10_2014

DSC_2173_round

 

Teach to transform!

Cheryl

Planning IB PYP in the Specialist / Single Subject Classroom

With no prior experience with teaching in an IB PYP school, starting out last year in my new school as the Classroom Music Teacher was quite a daunting experience.  I was truly blessed though to have great support in my Principal and other staff members who encouraged me to teach my music program from my previous school and try and link in to the class UOI’s where I could.

As I do in any situation I set about trying to impress as much as I could and link as often as I could to the classroom UOI which I thought would be the best PYP inquiry teaching.

What I found though was the skills/techniques I wanted to teach the children were not being done chronologically/developmentally as I tried to focus too much on the OUI taught in the classroom.  I was a little frustrated with this and didn’t understand how I could honour my discipline of teaching musicianship and authentically link to the PYP units being taught.

At the beginning of this year I went to the 3 day course “Making the PYP Happen in the Classroom”.  This was my first experience of IB PYP Professional Development and yes at the start I was completely overwhelmed by the whole thing.

While I learnt an incredible amount about how to teach using the PYP inquiry method my biggest question still wasn’t answered:

How can I teach classroom music in an IB school, using the inquiry methodologies to AUTHENTICALLY link to the class UOI and at the same time HONOUR my developmental curriculum.

This answer came 3 months later at an Arts Workshop for Single Subject Teachers presented by Theo Mandziy (Coordinator of Primary Single Subject Programme and Visual Arts teacher, Australian International School, Singapore)

At this workshop I realised I was focusing too much on the ‘UOI’ and not on the skill development of the children because I mistook linking with the classroom to be more important than the skill set I was teaching.

I was focusing on the topic/theme/idea eg using an indigenous song and then singing, dancing or playing instruments to it, rather than focusing on the skills & techniques and using my language during my lesson to link into the “concepts” being taught.

Theo presented 3 ways of planning:

  1. Specialist Driven UOI

This may be a wonderful concept & idea but Theo said it is very hard to pull off, especially if you are only part time.  This is where the Specialist subject teacher/s plan the UOI and the classroom teacher links in with it.

  1. Link with a class UOI

Specialist teachers don’t need to link with every UOI, as long as you find at least one UOI to link with in the year that is suffice.  To find this UOI look for authentic and purposeful links to the work in both classrooms, which allows you to honour the discipline that you are teaching.

You can write your own UOI that links with it or even take a line of inquiry from the classroom UOI.

The best way to link in is with the PYP Concepts being taught. Here the key is ensuring the language (key words/ideas) used in both class settings is the same or similar.

These links can be done before, during or after the class UOI is taught.  For example this year I have linked with the Year 6/7 OUI on Ancient Civilisations by teaching my Ancient Celtic Music unit before the class did theirs and this worked fine.

  1. Stand Alone OUI

Single subject teachers don’t need to teach all 6 transdisciplinary themes because it is unrealistic & not authentic to the disciplines being taught.  So while we need to teach 6 UOI over the whole year it may be more appropriate to teach from certain themes eg. “How we express ourselves”.

Our Stand Alone Units may also be taught throughout the whole year with no fixed start or end date.  For example you may use Musical Elements as your UOI.  Beat for example can be taught all year round as you refer to it along the way.

How have I now implemented this in my classroom?

I have since revamped my program have a look at my example overview from my Reception (5 yr olds) class:

IB PYP Single Subject Overview plannerview a pdf version here: IB PYP Single Subject Overview planner

I have 6 UOI, 4 year long ones & 2 that link to the classroom UOI.

To honour my discipline, I still use my developmental curriculum ‘The Interactive Music Room: A developmental classroom music program for interactive whiteboard, Book 1- beginning primary’ which I have adapted from ‘Music Room: A developmental classroom music program, Book 1 – Beginning Primary’.

However while this resource has been written with inquiry learning in mind, I always add other resources to this to enhance the UOI being taught and bring personal meaning to the students learning.

In the future I will post a blog on how I present and display this in my lessons.

I am and will be constantly looking at how I can better improve this.  And in no way do I believe I have conquered this task of a 100% answer to my initial question, on how to authentically plan a PYP UOI as a specialist/single subject teacher.  But I do believe I am now on the right path, or at least on the verge!

For me I have loved (and will continue to) the chase of aspiring to plan in the most effective and authentic way in a PYP school.  I am becoming a better teacher for it and can’t wait to see the results.

How has it changed me as a teacher?

The skills, techniques, activities, songs and instruments haven’t changed.  It has been the vocabulary I use when teaching which has changed as I focus more on the way I deliver information to the children to keep the lines of inquiry at the forefront of my lessons.

My questions to other PYP specialist/single subject teachers out there are: How do you plan?  What has worked for you in your school?  How do you link to the classroom UOI while staying true to your discipline?

Read part 2 in this series showing the overview of my 2014 planning.

DSC_2173_round

 

Teach to transform!

Cheryl